Book Review: Missing Witches

reviewcover-missing witchesTitle: Missing Witches

Author: Risa Dickens & Amy Torok

Genre: Non-Fiction, History, Witchcraft, Witches, Feminism

Rating: 2 Stars

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Description/Synopsis:

When you start looking for witches, you find them everywhere. As seekers and practitioners reclaim and restore magic to its rightful place among powerful forces for social, personal, and political transformation, more people than ever are claiming the identity of “Witch.” But our knowledge of witchcraft and magic has been marred by erasure, sensationalism, and sterilization, the true stories of history’s witches left untold.

Through meditations, stories, and practices, authors Risa Dickens and Amy Torok offer an intersectional, contemporary lens for uncovering and reconnecting with feminist witch history. Sharing traditions from all over the world—from Harlem to Haiti, Oaxaca to Mesopotamia—Missing Witches introduces readers to figures like Monica Sjoo, HP Blavatsky, Maria Sabina, and Enheduanna, shedding light on their work and the cultural and sociopolitical contexts that shaped it. Structured around the 8 sabbats of the Wheel of the Year, each chapter includes invocations, rituals, and offerings that incorporate the authors’ own wisdom, histories, and journeys of trauma, loss, and empowerment. Missing Witches offers an inside look at the vital stories of women who have practiced—and lived—magic.

WARNING – SPOILERS MAY ENSUE BEYOND THIS POINT – REVIEW BELOW

Missing Witches by Risa Dickens & Amy Torok was not what I expected. Going into this book, I was expecting a comprehensive telling of the unknown (or little known) histories of the witch… and it is only by a tenuous stretch of that expectation that I can say that the book tried.

The overall problem I faced is that the book was exceedingly scattered in the way it was written. The narrative was longwinded and cut frequently by even longer quotes and roundabout asides by the authors. On any given page, I found it difficult to discern what the current topic even was.

It is my feeling that the book was not organized well, and was written in such a way that only the most determined will be able to slog through it. This book will not be accessible to your average reader, and frankly, I’d encourage you to find your history elsewhere if you can.