Book Review: Phoenix Earth

review-cover-phoenixearthTitle: Phoenix earth: The Complete First Season

Author: Jaime Vendera, Melvyn Riley, Ronald Coleborn, Daniel Middleton

Genre: Science Fiction, Episodic

Rating: 1 Star

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Description/Synopsis:

After the final cataclysm claimed Earth, and seeding failed on Mars, the surviving humans had only one choice—seek out a new planet or die. Eventually, the surviving humans discovered Malakar, a small planet millions of light years away. In time, the two races merged, creating a new breed called Maluan. However, racism soon spread throughout the planet and the human and Maluans faced total extinction by evil Malakarans known as Creks. In a politically charged move to sweep the planet clean of all non-purebloods, the descendants of the human race are forced off Malakar to relocate to a planet dubbed X67 by Malakaran authorities. What unfolds is a maniacal scheme to destroy the Maluans and humans before they reach their new home, forcing them to leap at the speed of thought to a dead planet no one has seen in more than five hundred years: Earth.

Phoenix Earth follows the lives of an eclectic group as they bond together to stay alive and begin anew as they discover new alien races and struggle to help Earth rise from the ashes.

WARNING – SPOILERS MAY ENSUE BEYOND THIS POINT – REVIEW BELOW

Let me preface this review by saying right off the bat: This book just wasn’t for me. I’m a fan of science fiction, and I understand that this book and it’s “episodes” were meant to remind the reader of TV episodes in written form…I love science fiction TV just as equally as I love science fiction in novels… but this didn’t work for me. I tried to get into this book and its episodes. I read a bit, I put it down, I picked it back up… for well over a year I floundered with trying to push through Phoenix Earth. I just couldn’t do it.

The story started off with a lot of backstory, and it made it hard to engage right from the very beginning. Parts of the backstory were skimmed over, and it felt as if I were missing a lot of explanations about what was going on. Sometimes the explanations I was given, didn’t seem logical. The exchanges between the Malakaran’s and the Humans didn’t seem equal, but were treated as if they were. Radiation was treated as actual poison—which was only one of many instances in which the science was questionable.

To be blunt, the story tried too hard. The science wasn’t well thought out, the backstory was long and convoluted, the naming of both characters, groups, and locations was hard to remember and often sounded kind of hokey. (see: Correctors of Abomination and Dyzm’nd). There were a few instances in which I caught missing words, and sometimes entirely made-up words (that were treated as if they weren’t made up… see: bastages). Sometimes the punctuation was questionable and words were overused (delicacies seemed to be quite common in their universe). The dialogue seemed forced and reminded me entirely too much of some early episodes of Star Trek… just, overwhelmingly dramatic and impersonal. At times the author seemed to be holding the reader’s hand, explaining or qualifying events in such a way that it sucked the impact and tension out of the scene.

All of these things were small in and of themselves, but when compacted down into the first 6% of the story…. it was too much. When the book came to the point where the narrator was comparing the events in the book to the Jewish Holocaust (more than once), I put the book down. I couldn’t do it.

I think the idea behind writing a series of episodic stories that fall into a larger story arc (as with TV episodes) is an intriguing idea… but there were too many times where I sat back and questioned the logic of the characters, the science behind the world building, and the quality of the writing. It shouldn’t be that difficult to read 6% into a book. I didn’t feel sucked into the story or engaged by the narrative. It was all right—but it wasn’t enough to balance out the less attractive aspects of the writing, and in the end I couldn’t finish the book.

Overall, I didn’t like it. I’m sure there’s someone out there that will eat this series up with a spoon…. it just wasn’t for me. I think to really get into the book you’re going to need a deep love for the science fiction as a genre, and the ability to turn off your inner science geek. If the accuracy of the science in science fiction is something you need to get through a novel, this isn’t going to be for you—but I think if you can turn that off and just enjoy the drama and entertainment value of the story, you’ll probably be able to enjoy it a lot more than I did.

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3 thoughts on “Book Review: Phoenix Earth

  1. Pingback: Weekend Wrap-Up #11 | Author Unpublished

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